11 March 2007

Forgotten markers of history

Various periods of our past have left marks on the land from big holes in the ground to statues above ground. Here are five, each telling a little story about Singapore's history. Photo essay.

13 comments:

Daniel said...

I am curious about the ownership of the land of the old railroad to Jurong. Does Malaysia still own the land beneath that railroad line? I jog along the Ulu Pandan park connector just north of Clementi and always see that bridge overhead. It looks forested at the southern side with some kind of vegetable garden back in there, but it seems to be blocked off with drainage ditches and barriers so I never thought about looking around in there. This is a different bridge from the one in your picture, but I guess it's the same railroad. Do you know if the government owns the land, or what's going on in there?

Anonymous said...

Continuing on with Daniel's comments, I have often hoped that the unused railway line could be turned into a pedestrian and bicycle path, like the "Rails to Trails" programme in some US cities.

I also use the Ulu Pandan park connector and it is very busy for a couple hours every morning and again in the evening. While people here don't "hang out" in parks as much as they do in more moderate climates, there seems to be a good demand here for places to exercise, roller blade, bicycle, jog or walk. The path is very popular with everyone from babies in prams to senior citizens doing their morning exercises. I even see a few people commuting to work every day using the park connector.

It would be wonderful to have more of such spaces when they benefit so many.

Anonymous said...

what about ZHUJIAO CENTRE, ZHENGHUA ESTATE????

Janice said...

I particularly enjoy this photo essay post.

Very nice, thanks :)

Ray said...

Just a note.

Saw a number of statues fitting the description of "Chinese Legendary Sages & Heroes" scattered around the Chinese Garden recently (5th Feb 2007).

Looked a little new though, but they maybe the ones you were looking for.

Anonymous said...

the statues at Marina South Park have been moved to Chinese Garden

Abao said...

Interesting photo essay that showcases less well known parts of Singapore's brief but shining history.

Wayne said...

This was a most interesting photo essay in which I enjoyed tremendously. I wondered if you have ever gone to the Sun Yat Sen Museum. In my opinion, one of the hidden gems in terms of places of historical interests in Singapore.

Yawning Bread Sampler said...

Wayne - I thought about the Sun Yat Sen Museum, but it doesn't quite fit the "forgotten" bill - I mean, it has a museum dedicated to it, for a start :).... but yeah, people should visit it.

Kevin said...

"Might it mean something that during the reign of Lee Hsien Loong, the works of his father Lee Kuan Yew are being packed away? Isn't that something to chew on?"

Chewing, chewing, chewing.....

ben lim said...

Loved your photo essay.

You've done really good work here putting together counter and resistance narratives for Singaporeans to fight "official" versions of history and culture. I especially like your comment on the "Asian" values campaign being non-"organic."

BTW -- If I'm not not mistaken, Gavin Young's book "In Search of Conrad" mentions that Conrad wrote about those dry docks in one of his books, either Queen's dock or King's dock.

Pls keep up the good work.

Jon G said...

Wonderful photo essay. I really enjoyed it. Thanks.

Gaurav said...

Thanks for the photoessay, YB! It was a pleasure to see the Jurong train line photos, since I live down the road from them, but the docks looked beautiful too. Once again, thanks!